Tuesday, December 04, 2007

New Animal, Part II

I am sure all my regular reader remembers my "girraffifly" (Lepidoptra giraffenseii) commonly known as the Texas Longneck Jeezerfly. A fine specimen that I made up all by myself, named by the readers of this blog.

Now it is time to introduce an all-new species that my middle daughter discovered. In her fear of arachnids, she is ever-vigilant for new manifestations of spider, and so her watchful eye spotted a fleeting glance at one of these: a Pronghorn Tarantalope.

What you see is a sort of police-sketch-artist-rendition, based on her description. Study this well, and see if you observe any in your area. I am going to study the habitat, range, diet and IQ of this creature, if any.

Please report sightings and behavioral observations in the comments.

*WHAT'S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE*
Be the first to comment with the right answer (except NancyV) and be internationally recognized! I can say that because of my friend in London and the hit that I received from Japan this morning.

**UPDATE**
Well, our fiend, Invigilator Tex is the grand winner because of his speedy and correct answer of "nine legs". Congratulations on your quick eyes and wit to match. The world bows at your feet.

Of course, the conventional wisdom is that since this specimen is apparently of the arachnid family that nine legs is a surplus of limbs. My contention is that if eight is good, then nine is great. And being from Texas, it only makes sense that the extra leg (or legs, we're not sure if this one was injured or not) would ensure a perfect fit for being in Texas. Just a theory, but as my father-in-law used to say, "I may not always be right, but I'm NEVER wrong."

Mr. Wollf; this animal was not spotted recently, it's just now that I got the "police sketch" up. The report came in several weeks ago.

16 comments:

invigilator_tex said...

I count nine legs. Most arachnids have only eight (not counting the Three Mile Island sub-species).

Do I win?

the photoSmith said...

well tex beat me to it... the back leg shadows do not match up. you may have won this one tex, but now i'm out for redemption...

aA said...

one entry. any other takers?

aA said...

wow, one other slipped in while i was commenting myself!

más?

PaperBoy said...

The ultimate compliment: This is your best work yet!

Stepsistah said...

I wasn't aware that anything that might make up the Pronghorn Tarantalope would 'still' have a tail. I was always told that the Momma Pronghorns chewed the infant tail at birth.

in said...

eep.

aA said...

stepsistah; that's a myth. or a mytheth, depending on the marital status...

Rob V. said...

Jeepers !!! I hope I don't see any Pronghorn Tarantalopes in my dreams. I, too, count nine legs, which would be one leg too many for something in the spider family. Howsome-ever, a cross between an antelope and a spider might conceivably have 10 legs, in which case your rendition would be 1 leg short.

Howlsatmoon said...

Ok, I gotta be the Pronghorn picker. Ol' Wollf, who regularly stalks these beauties outside of Prescott wonders if it was seen yesterday?

Wouldn't have the "antlers". They lose 'em in the early fall.

Tis the Season, add a bright, lighted nose and you can have Rudolf the Red nosed Tarantelope.

Oh, that was worse than my usua.
Wollf

Howlsatmoon said...

Oh, By the way....You have the spiify, double cool distinction of being added to the Wollf Pack.

You are hereby "linked". heh.
Unless I screw it up......
Wollf

invigilator_tex said...

so what's the answer? Did I win? Did I win? Don't keep us in suspense.

aA said...

i Tex...ok, i fixed it.

Wollf, thanx, man. i'm honored.

mr. V, you may be right, further research and observation and comparing notes will bear this out, i'm sure.

or not.

Howlsatmoon said...

Have you ever seen the rare "Spotted Eagollf". I thought I saw one just once.....

But I "may" haave been drinking....
Wollf

Micke in London said...

I was very surprised to see a Pronghorne in Tex. You may not know this but the Pronghorne is acctaully quite common in the Northern part of Sweden, and due to the cold winters its not uncommon for them to hibernate for extended periods that may include many years until it gets at least a few degres above 0. my theory is that this creature came with your great grandfather during his extended commute to America, (apparantly he was only supposed to go to the local shop however through a number of unfortunate events.....), anyway, the Pronghorne probably joined him on this journey.

Please tell your daughter that she should not worry, as long as she put a bowle of blueberry with milk once a week or so, although I heard that these days cornflakes work as well!

aA said...

Mikael, i will do some research into the possibility of my anscestors introducing the Tarantalope to Texas! my great-grandfather, direct from Sweden, owned a couple of bakeries in Central Texas. he may have been the one!

thanks for the information. this is very interesting and i will report it to the scientific community!

i will also give my daughter your advice for appeasement of the creature. she will appreciate it.